Who is at most risk of developing allergies and hayfever

Who is at most risk of developing allergies and hayfever

Allergies are a common health problem, with hayfever in particular affecting approximately one in four people in Australia and New Zealand.1 Unlike many other health conditions, allergies do not discriminate between men or women, or racial groups. In fact, there are relatively few risk factors for allergies. Some of the most common factors involved in allergies are:

Family history

You are more likely to develop allergies if you have family members who suffer from conditions such as hayfever or hives.

Age

Children are more likely to develop allergies than adults. They can also outgrow them as they get older.2

Having an existing allergic condition

Having an existing allergic condition makes you more likely to develop an allergy to something else.2

Environmental exposure

People who are consistently exposed to substances that can trigger allergies (allergens) in their home or work environment, are more likely to develop an allergy. According to research, babies exposed to cigarette smoke from a young age may also be at increased risk of allergies.2